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When were Brazil last eliminated in the World Cup group stages?

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Brazil have a long-standing association with the World Cup as one of the most iconic nations to compete for the famous trophy.

The Selecao have produced many of the greatest footballers to ever walk the earth and a lot of those stars enjoyed success on the biggest stage in world football.

However, while Brazil remain one of the most successful sides in World Cup history, there have been years where games haven’t quite gone to plan.

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Brazil are one of the biggest established global forces in international football and their record at the World Cup backs that up. They have consistently reached the knockout stages in the modern era, though the Selecao have endured four unsuccessful tournaments since their last victory in 2002.

However, their record in the group stage remains excellent. They haven’t lost a game in the first phase of a World Cup since 1998, when they were surprisingly beaten 2-1 by Norway on the final matchday of the group.

In total, Brazil have been knocked out of the World Cup at the first group stage on three occasions. The last time was in 1966, during England’s victorious campaign when Brazil finished third in Group C following defeats to Hungary and Portugal. The South Americans had won the previous two tournaments and were among the favourites with stars like Pele, Garrincha and Jairzinho in their squad.

That Brazil side would put things right four years later as their star-studded lineup thrilled audiences in Mexico and around the world, beating Italy 4-1 in the final.

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The only two other occasions where Brazil failed to progress came in the 1930 and 1934. A loss to Yugoslavia saw Brazil finish behind the Europeans in the former, while the latter saw them exit to Spain at the round of 16 stage in a single-elimination tournament format. They had qualified for the finals having not played any games due to the withdrawal of their opponents.

Brazil celebrate winning the 2002 World Cup

Brazil celebrate winning the 2002 World Cup / Alex Livesey/GettyImages

Brazil are the most successful side in men’s World Cup history, winning the tournament five times in total. Pele announced himself to the world with two goals in the 1958 final against Sweden before the Selecao retained their title four years later in Chile.

The 1970 success was arguably the most iconic in Brazil’s history, beating sides like then holders England, Peru and Uruguay before smashing Italy 4-1 in Mexico City.

Brazil had to endure 24 grim years before getting their hands on the trophy again. The Azzurri again suffered in the final as the South Americans triumphed 3-2 on penalties after a goalless game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.

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They were beaten finalists in 1998 as France came out 3-0 victors in the final, but in 2002 Ronaldo vanquished his demons by leading Brazil to seven wins from seven games, scoring twice in the final against Germany.

Brazil won’t exit the 2022 World Cup at the group stage, having qualified for the last 16 ahead of their final Group G game against Cameroon.

Tite’s side were made to work hard in their first outing by Serbia before Richarlison netted a late double, while there was more drama against Switzerland as Casemiro scored an 83rd-minute winner.

They will likely be crowned group winners on the final matchday, which would set up a clash against the runners up from Group H. Ghana, Uruguay and South Korea all remain in contention for that qualification spot behind likely group winners Portugal.

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Player ratings as Los Blancos seal comfortable win

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Second half goals from Marco Asensio and Vinicius Junior were enough for Real Madrid to fend off a ten-man Valencia team in La Liga.

Real Madrid almost took the lead inside the opening three minutes, when Valencia’s pourous defence was exposed by a wonderful through ball from Luka Modric. The pass played Marco Asensio clean through on goal, but the Spanish international’s subsequent effort on goal was well saved by Giorgi Mamardashvili.

15 minutes later Asensio was denied the opener again, this time by ex-Arsenal man Gabriel Paulista. The centre-back did brilliantly to dive in front of Asensio’s strike from around the penalty spot to keep the score a 0-0.

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Eduardo Camavinga was next to go close for Los Blancos, firing into the side-netting from the left-hand side of the box.

The home side thought they’d finally broke the deadlock in added time at the end of the first half thanks to Antonio Rudiger. The German international tracked Luka Modric corner kick from the left to head into the net, but the goal was disallowed after a VAR check on a Karim Benzema ‘foul’.

Los Blancos came out of the traps well at the start of the second half and deservedly took the lead through Asensio in the 52nd minute. The wide forward cannoned the ball into the top left corner of the net from outside of the box, leaving Mamardashvili rooted to the spot.

90 seconds later it was 2-0.

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This time it was Vinicius Junior who’d find the net, bursting down the left flank before side-footing into the right corner of the net.

Things went from bad to worse for Valencia in the 71st minute when Gabriel Paulista was sent off for an utterly despicable kick out at Vinicius Junior. A thuggish, rather pathetic, action from the ex-Arsenal man.

GK – Thibaut Courtois – 5/10 – Had literally nothing to do.

RB – Nacho Fernandez – 6/10 – Got forward on his side well.

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CB – Eder Militao – N/A – Subbed with an injury in the first half.

CB – Antonio Rudiger – 6/10 – Scored an offside goal and had basically nothing to do in the defensive third.

LB – Eduardo Camavinga – 7/10 – Looks like he’s found a position he can call home at left-back.

CM – Luka Modric – 7/10 – His usual self.

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CM – Toni Kroos – 5/10 – He doesn’t look as comfortable in the defensive midfield position.

CM – Dani Ceballos – 6/10 – Did well again in midfield.

RW – Marco Asensio – 8/10 – Missed a few chances in the first half but more than made up for them in the second with a stunning goal.

ST – Karim Benzema – 7/10 – His passing was as good as ever,

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LW – Vinicius Junior – 8/10 – Scored a wonderful goal to seal the win.

SUB – Dani Carvajal – 6/10.

SUB – Rodrygo Goes – 6/10.

SUB – Federico Valverde – N/A.

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SUB – Aurelien Tchouameni – N/A.



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When windows are and what competitions are there?

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For so many fans, international breaks are the scourge of the football calendar. They interrupt the season just as your team seems to be building up a head of steam and putting some results together.

They can provide some brilliant entertainment though if you look in the right places, and they are also a valuable rest for some of your team’s most important players.

The introduction of the UEFA Nations League has meant that we don’t get international breaks filled with totally meaningless friendlies. The games do mean something, even if they don’t garner mass public interest until the business end of the competition.

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Here is a look at what international breaks are coming up for the rest of the season and what games are being played.

Due to the 2022 Qatar FIFA World Cup being held in the winter, the entire football calendar has been thrown out of kilter and many decisions feel subject to change as the season goes on.

There was an international break on the weekend on September 24, 2022, and the World Cup itself between November 13 and December 25 was classed as an international break, with play in the Premier League resuming on Boxing Day.

That means that the final international break to affect the Premier League is set to be the weekend of March 25, 2023. The break will officially be March 20 – March 28.

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There are more breaks in the women’s football calendar, so there is one coming between February 13 and February 22, and another between April 3 and April 11.

There is going to be a set of EURO 2024 qualifiers in the March international break next month. These will be the first games of that particular qualifying campaign after the groups were drawn some weeks ago.

England have been drawn in a group with Italy, Malta, North Macedonia and Ukraine, meaning it will not be easy to navigate. On March 23 at 19:45 GMT, England will take on Italy away at Napoli’s Stadio Diego Armando Maradona.

Then on March 26 at 17:00 GMT, England will host Ukraine at Wembley, meaning they’ll go up against their two toughest opponents immediately ahead of the clashes against Malta and North Macedonia in June.

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Northern Ireland will be away at San Marino and at home to Finland. Republic of Ireland will only be playing one game and that is at home against World Cup finalists France. Scotland will face Cyprus at home and then will also host Spain, whilst Wales face Croatia away and Latvia at home.

The England Women are only playing one game during the February international break. They will take on South Korea at home on February 16.



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How much do 2022/23 winners earn?

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UEFA Champions League action is almost back with the knockout stages set to get underway on Tuesday, February 14. The group stage threw up plenty of drama and some great goals, but the business end of the tournament is where things get serious and the money starts to be made.

The Champions League is the most lucrative club competition in the world and more and more money is earned the further a team goes. Here is a breakdown of what is up for grabs and how it will be divided in 2022/23.

There are many different factors to decide how much money a team earns from their participation in the Champions League. More money is earned from every single game that is won, meaning if you’re through to the knockouts with a game to go, it can still be worth winning that final game.

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The total prize pot from UEFA for the Champions League this season is a whopping £1.72bn (€2.03bn/$1.98bn). That figure will be divided up between the participating teams as they tournament goes on.

In comparison, the prize pot for the UEFA Europa League is €465m, while for the UEFA Conference League it is €235m.

Last season’s champions Real Madrid earned €83.2m from their involvement in the Champions League after they beat Liverpool in the final in Paris. They didn’t stop there, getting another €4.5m from winning the UEFA Super Cup.

It was pre-determined what the maximum amount that one team could win is from the 2022/23 tournament, and the figure stands at €85.14m. That is if a team wins all of their group stage matches and then wins the tournament.

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As you would expect, the majority of the money is handed out based on performance. There are two other ways in which the money is distributed though. 55% of it is based on performance, 30% is based on coefficient ranking, and the last 15% is broadcast revenues. The 55% is divided as follows:

Coefficients

UEFA have got their own coefficient algorithm which ranks each club’s European performance in the previous 10-year period. That pot of €600.6m is paid out to all 32 clubs in the group stage, as per their coefficient ranking.

Teams that have won European trophies in recent history will be higher up that ranking than those who are only just taking part in the tournament for the first time. The lowest-ranked team earns one share (€1.137m), while the top-ranked team earns 32 shares, or €36.38m.

Broadcast money

The final 15% of the money is based on broadcast revenues and then distributed accordingly. These figures are only final once all of the broadcast deals in each country have been decided upon.

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The footballing governing body of each country that has a team in the Champions League that season gets a share of €300.3m and that share size is dependant on the proportional value of their TV market. It is then distributed to the clubs taking part from each country.

50% of the allocation that, for example, the FA receives, will be divided among the participating clubs based on fixed percentages determined by UEFA. The other 50% is paid out in propertion with the amount of matches that each club plays in the competition. Therefore the further your team goes, the more broadcast revenue they receive.

The first legs are being played on February 14, 15, 21 and 22, with the second legs played on March 7, 8, 14 and 15.



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