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World Cup 2022: Beer to be banned inside stadiums in Qatar (Details)

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World Cup 2022: Beer to be banned inside stadiums in Qatar (Details)

As per Reuters, the World Cup stadiums in Qatar are set to be without alcohol-free because of severe controls on liquor in the Muslim country.

“At stadiums, the plans are still being finalised, but the current discussion is to allow fans to have beer upon arrival and when leaving stadium, but beer won’t be served during the match or inside the stadium bowl,” a source said.

That implies that fans might have the option to purchase beer during confined times in specific pieces of the primary fan zone in Doha, the capital of the country.

In 2014, FIFA figured out how to persuade the experts in Brazil to lift the prohibition on beer inside the arenas during the World Cup there. This time, the host country’s traditions appear to be too strong.

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Source: Reuters

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Portugal to ‘present evidence’ to FIFA that Cristiano Ronaldo scored vs Uruguay

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Portugal are set to make a case to FIFA that Bruno Fernandes’ first goal in their 2-0 World Cup win against Uruguay should instead be awarded to Cristiano Ronaldo.

The Selecao took the lead on Monday night after a cross from Fernandes bounced up and into the top corner, though Ronaldo wheeled away in celebration claiming the goal after trying to meet it with a header.

But replays suggested the forward didn’t actually get a touch on the ball, with the strike officially awarded to Fernandes, who secured a brace from the penalty spot in second half stoppage time after Ronaldo had been substituted.

Ronaldo is just one goal away from tying Eusebio’s record as Portugal’s all-time scorer at World Cups, with the Benfica legend out in front on nine.

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According to El Chiringuito, Portugal will ‘present evidence’ to FIFA that Ronaldo got a touch on the ball and should therefore be awarded the goal.

Harry Symeou hosts Scott Saunders and Toby Cudworth to look back on South Korea/Japan ’02 as part of the ‘Our World Cup’ series. We take a trip down memory lane – join us!

If you can’t see the podcast embed, click here to download or listen to the episode in full!

The case bares similarities to one featuring Harry Kane for Tottenham back in 2018. The England captain claimed that he got a tiny touch on a free-kick from Christian Eriksen in a Premier League match against Stoke as he went in search of a third successive Golden Boot.

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The goal was retroactively awarded to Kane by the Premier League, but he would still end the season two strikes behind Liverpool’s Mohamed Salah.



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FIFA issues response over World Cup stadium capacity confusion

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FIFA have attempted to offer clarification as the confusion over stadium capacities at the World Cup continues to grow.

Ever since Qatar kicked off the competition against Ecuador last weekend, fans and commentators have been observing vast swathes of empty seats in stadiums during the majority of World Cup matches.

Many have been quick to attribute this to a lack of interest in a World Cup hosted by Qatar, a feeling which was exacerbated by fans leaving in droves at half-time in that opening fixture.

To clear things up, FIFA have issued a statement claiming that attendance has been around 94% since the tournament began.

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“Official figures show that the average overall match attendance stands at an impressive 94 per cent compared to stadium capacities for the event,” a FIFA statement said.

“The highest match attendance of the tournament was the game at Lusail Stadium on 24 November, with 88,103 there to see Brazil beat Serbia 2-0.”

FIFA also attempted to clarify official attendance figures released throughout the competition, which have suggested that the number of attendees has exceeded the capacity of the various stadiums built to host the tournament.

Harry Symeou hosts Scott Saunders, Grizz Khan and Jack Gallagher to look back on France ’98 as part of the ‘Our World Cup’ series. We take a trip down memory lane – join us!

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If you can’t see the podcast embed, click here to download or listen to the episode in full!

“Earlier in the week, FIFA also clarified the official capacities and tournament requirements for each of the eight stadiums,” the statement said.

“While FIFA requests that venues hosting the final match, opening game and semi-finals can host a minimum of 80,000 and 60,000 spectators respectively, the magnificent Lusail Stadium can accommodate 88,966 spectators, while Al Bayt Stadium can host up to 68,895 fans.

“For all other matches, a minimum 40,000-seater capacity is required, with the demountable Stadium 974 being the most compact of all Qatar 2022 venues (44,089).

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“The capacity figures for the tournament have been finalised after all operational arrangements were made – from the final seating map to temporary infrastructure to accommodate media, broadcasters, and guests.

“It was also explained that capacities for specific matches such as opening and final may vary slightly, and that figures for legacy mode are different and provided by the Host Country.”



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FIFA president Gianni Infantino delivers bizarre press conference on eve of World Cup

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FIFA president Gianni Infantino gave a confusing, and at times offensive, press conference one day before the 2022 World Cup kicks off.

The decision to award Qatar the showpiece tournament back in 2010 kicked off a string of controversies relating to the nation’s human rights record, while their treatment of migrant workers leading up to the World Cup has also come under fire.

With kick-off just one day away, there remain plenty of open criticisms regarding this World Cup, and Infantino gave a strange and disrespectful presser prior to the tournament’s opening.

“Today I have very strong feelings. Today I feel Qatari. Today I feel Arab. Today I feel African. Today I feel gay. Today I feel disabled. Today I feel a migrant worker,” Infantino began.

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“I’m not Qatari, African, gay, disabled & I’m not really a migrant worker but I know what it means to be discriminated & bullied, as a foreign in a foreign country, as a child at school I was bullied because I had red hair and freckles. I was bullied for that.

“We have been taught many many lessons by Europeans. I am European. I think what we Europeans have been doing around the world for the last 3,000 years, we should be apologising for the next 3,000 years before giving moral lessons to people.

“Who is actually caring about the workers? FIFA does, football does, the World Cup does & to be fair to them Qatar does as well. I was at an event a few days ago where we explained what we were doing at this World Cup for disabled people.

“400 journalists are here [at my press conference], that event was covered by four journalists. There is one billion disabled people in the world. Nobody cares. Nobody cares. Four journalists.

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“Europe could do as Qatar did. Create some channels, some legal channels, where a number of those workers could come to Europe. Low revenues. But give them some work, some future, some hope.

“When it comes to compensation of workers, you should know there is a legal framework to cover workers’ compensation. We are in a sovereign country. Do you think FIFA can go to England or Italy and say ‘we will establish a system for migrant workers in your country’?

“Let me mention as well the LGBT situation. I’ve been speaking about this topic with the highest leadership of this country, several times, not just once & they have confirmed & I can confirm that everyone is welcome.

“If a person says the opposite, it’s not the opinion of the country & it’s certainly not the opinion of FIFA. Everyone who comes to Qatar is welcome. Whatever religion, race, sexual orientation, belief. This is our requirement & the Qatari state sticks to that.”

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Harry Symeou hosts Scott Saunders, Brian Goldfarb, Sean Walsh & Ali Rampling from the 90min editorial team to look back on Brazil ’14 as part of the ‘Our World Cups’ series. We take a trip down memory lane – join us!

Infantino then discussed Friday’s decision to ban the sale of alcohol near stadiums in a sudden U-turn, insisting FIFA have not lost control of the World Cup.

“Every decision taken at this World Cup is a joint decision between Qatar & FIFA. It is discussed, debated & taken jointly,” he continued.

“I think personally, if for three hours a day you cannot drink a beer, you will survive because actually the same rules apply in France, Spain, Portugal, Scotland.”

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Infantino was also asked about Iran’s participation at the tournament given their current political instability, and offered a bizarre suggestion in response.

“If we should go with a tournament to Iran, let’s go because maybe that will change something,” he replied.



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